Propaganda
"Information, esp. of a biased or misleading nature, used to promote or publicize a particular political cause or point of view."
- Merriam Webster's Dictionary


What is Propaganda?


The purpose of propaganda is for a person or a congregation of people to persuade others that their cause is the right way and the only way to go. Propaganda is information that's usually government based, and is used to persuade/influence a substantial group of people. The word propaganda typically means it's information, either if it's accurate or fallacious. By the end of World War II propaganda implied that the information was one-sided, corrupt, and an outright lie. To an antagonist it was 'propaganda,' and to those who were on the same perspective it was 'information' or 'news.' Propaganda can be accomplished through posters, radio broadcasts, slogans in newspapers or/and in a bomb-sized capsule that's dropped over the adversary. The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) was an emcee in World War II, that provisioned propaganda through their radio broadcasts.







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Propaganda Poster
http://www.teacheroz.com/WWIIpropaganda.htm




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Russian Propaganda Capsules

http://www.ostfront.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen
=CTGY&Category_Code=New_Items

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Soldier Filling Propaganda Bomb With 22,500 Leaflets

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airborne_leaflet_propaganda




Works Cited:
This book was over all the most informational and organized of all the sources we used; It explained what propaganda is, how you can use ...........
...........it, and how it was used in WW II. There were a few more key ideas needed that we had to factually produce, so we turned to some other sites.

Adapted from:
Feldman, George. "Art, Entertainment, and Propaganda."
World War II. Almanac. Ed. Christine Slovey. Vol. 2. Detroit: U X L, 2000. 369-74. Print. Almanac.



Gathering informational facts on this website gave us the boost about WW II we needed, for readers to know how propaganda was used in
...........that time. This site wasn't very good to get a lot of information from, but it was okay for at least a couple main ideas.

Adapted from:
Fostaty, Gerry. "American Propaganda in WWII." Think Quest. Think Quest Library, 2001. Web. 12 Dec. 2011.
<http://library.thinkquest.org/C0111500/ww2/american/amerprop.htm>.



Finding this site helped a lot on the detailed use of propaganda in WW II; That we later combined into the first WW II website we found, to
...........make the out come explanatory of propaganda come out to be an excellent source.

Adapted from:
Soules, Marshall. "Propaganda and War." Media-Studies@ca :: Home//. Malaspina University-College, 12 Dec. 2011.
Web. 12 Dec. 2011. <http://www.media-studies.ca/articles/war_propaganda.htm>.